Ivana Taylor

Ivana Taylor is a textile and furniture designer who combines textiles and timber to create beautifully tactile designed objects that are functional but also abstract and intriguing. 

 

After graduating from UNSW, Ivana was accepted into the highly selective Associate Program at JamFactory, Adelaide. Ivana is currently in her second year of this program, developing her practice in the furniture studio. 

 

Ivana has had work featured in Denfair 2019, Melbourne Design Week 2020 and Wallpaper* magazine’s Graduate Directory 2020, Vogue and Real Living magazine, as well as exhibitions at JamFactory and the Australian Design Centre. Ivana has exhibited in group shows with, and is now represented exclusively by, Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert. Taylor is included in Discovered at London’s Design Museum September-October 2021. Taylor’s solo exhibition Reframe at Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert is November-December 2021. 

 

Playing with the relationship between textiles and timber, Ivana’s practice distills the process, texture and aesthetic qualities that have evolved from a long-standing fixation on wrapping. Her furniture designs are often heavily textured, reflecting a fascination for the role of visually and physically textural objects like furniture, to engage multiple senses. 

 

The principles of design-for-disassembly are equally influential to her practice. Using continuous knotting and wrapping to attach and remove upholstery, results in furniture that can be used in its naked form or re-wrapped, engaging a ritual process of binding textile flesh to timber bones. 

Narrative is an equally important foundation to her work. Influenced by her Honours studies and work as a university research assistant, Ivana seeks to explore how objects can be educational and evocative of the narratives and places that inspired them. 

 

Ivana also works with the newly established APY Arts Collective in Adelaide, working collaboratively with Indigenous Australian artisans from across the APY Lands on a range of product development workshops. 

 

Playing with the relationship between textiles and timber, Taylor’s practice distills the process, texture and aesthetic qualities that have evolved from a long-standing fixation on wrapping. Her furniture designs are often heavily textured, reflecting a fascination for the role of visually and physically textural objects like furniture, to engage multiple senses.